“Time to expose faculty corruption in sports”

March 19, 2008

Here’s an intriguing op-ed out of the Drake Group, an organization created to help faculty and university staff defend academic integrity in the face of big-time college sports.  The key call in this screed is to out jock-sniffing faculty who give athletes “As” just for showing up (at least occasionally).  Let’s name names at Rutgers.  We know the departments they teach in; let’s put the names of these corrupt faculty in lights.

Much of what the Drake Group has online is worth a look, by the way.  Rutgers is not alone in facing a rising tide of academic corruption.  But there is comfort to take in having allies at other schools, people who understand that Rutgers can exist without football but without classes and professors there is no Rutgers.


Bogus Courses, Bogus Credits

March 17, 2008

Do athletes get preferential treatment academically — are they steered to “gut” courses taught by jock-sniffing professors? MLive.com offers an astonishingly detailed — and horrifying — report on the teachings of just one prolific professor at the Univ. of Michigan. The expose continues, with yet more evidence of a massive academic fraud perpetrated by Michigan administrators and professors, to keep athletes qualified to play.  The Day 3 report piles on the evidence of academic deception. The fourth and final instalment is here.

This comes on the heels of a New York Times expose of similar doings at Auburn.

Between them, these reports document the fraud that characterizes the “education” of athletes, who seemingly fatten their GPAs with “independent study” courses that involve, well, nothing that a reasonably alert 9th grader wouldn’t have mastered years before matriculating in university. When they must take “actual” courses, they enroll in classes that oftentimes are reserved only for athletes, no civilian students welcome.

What happened to the “student” in student-athlete?

Do you still think Rutgers is immune?

Extra-credit round: we are soliciting tips on professors who provide preferential treatment to athletes on the Banks. Our goal is to name names and, ideally, to come up with enough detail to entice a New York Times reporter to take the bait and pursue a story about Rutgers. We know this is happening now — the “tutors,” the tame professors, the easy courses — the panoply of academic fraud so vividly depicted in Tom Wolfe’s I Am Charlotte Simmons. Send in your tips about fraud at Rutgers! Be an academic hero.


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